top of page

School Of the Prophets

Public·31 members

Love For Imperfect Things: How To Accept Yourse...


Maimouna Youssef uttered the words I began this review with when in her Tiny Desk concert earlier this year. "We are spiritual beings having a human experience," she said, "and nothing else is ever true." Our human experience is bound to be imperfect. We are all imperfect things. And we are all worthy of love. That is the lesson I hope to carry personally into the new year, for myself and for others, and that I think this whole harsh world can benefit from. I thank Haemin Sunim greatly for providing 272 humble, kind, and generous pages reminding us of exactly that, along with practical advice for how to act on it every day.




Love for Imperfect Things: How to Accept Yourse...



Many of us respond to the pressures of life by turning inwards and ignoring problems, sometimes resulting in anxiety or depression. Others react by working harder at work, at school or at home, hoping that this will make ourselves and the people we love happier.But what if being yourself is enough? Just as we are advised on airplanes to take our own oxygen first before helping others, we must first be at peace with ourselves before we can be at peace with the world around us.In this beautiful follow-up to his international bestseller The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down, Buddhist monk Haemin Sunim turns his trademark wisdom and kindness to self-care, arguing that only by accepting yourself - and the flaws which make you who you are - can you have compassionate and fulfilling relationships with your partner, family and friends.


Love for Imperfect Things: How to Accept Yourself in a World Striving for Perfectionby Haemin Sunim, Lisk Feng, Deborah SmithSusan Cain, New York Times bestselling author of Quiet: "The world could surely use a little more love, a little more compassion, and a little more wisdom. In Love for Imperfect Things, Haemin Sunim shows us how to cultivate all three, and to find beauty in the most imperfect of things--including your very own self."A #1 internationally bestselling book of spiritual wisdom about learning to love ourselves, with all our imperfections, by the Buddhist author of The Things You Can See Only When You Slow DownHearing the words "be good to yourself first, then to others" was like being struck by lightning.Many of us respond to the pressures of life by turning inward and ignoring problems, sometimes resulting in anxiety or depression. Others react by working harder at the office, at school, or at home, hoping that this will make ourselves and the people we love happier. But what if being yourself is enough? Just as we are advised on airplanes to take our own oxygen first before helping others, we must first be at peace with ourselves before we can be at peace with the world around us.


Right on Chandrama, I have learned to love my wife's imperfections because they along with her perfections make her who she is. Also, I know I have a lot of imperfections so I appreciate her understanding and living with me.


Embracing Growth: When both individuals have the courage and humility to see themselves as imperfect human beings who can benefit from personal growth, there is a greater opportunity for harmony to enter their relationship. Harmony is possible when each person can own their mistakes and seek to correct them. Understand that friction is bound to happen because ego\u2019s generally do not want to accept responsibility for how they feel \u2013 this creates the conditions for the projections that normally cause miscommunication and arguments. One of the main ways to combat these needless moments of conflict is for each individual to keep building their self-awareness so they do not fall for the tricks of ego-driven narratives.


Godwin: Thank you. What does it indicate? It indicates in a way those who find it difficult to forgive themselves, it means that they are very hard on themselves. So they are too stone-hearted on themselves to say: I don't deserve to be forgiven. And then others who find it difficult to forgive others, they can be very very hard on others. So you see the importance of developing softness, you realize the importance of being gentle, you feel the importance of feeling tender to oneself and to others. So when you develop these qualities, naturally, you can forgive yourself and you can forgive others. So as I said, what we have to learn and I think it is extremely important, is to learn to accept our humanness, learn to accept we are imperfect human beings, that we still have shortcomings. In the same say, we have to realize that we are living in a world where people are imperfect, where people are humans, so you're bound to see the shortcomings, human frailties arising from others and from yourself. So according to the Buddha's teaching, we have greed, we have hatred, we have delusion in us and in others. So because of greed, hatred and delusion, we shall have shortcomings and make mistakes. Only someone who are completely enlightened will not have these shortcomings but as long as we are not enlightened, we are human, we are imperfect. So I feel that it is extremely important to learn to realize this, to accept this and learn to forgive ourselves and to forgive others and then when you can see in these terms, as I said, you will be able to forgive yourself and forgive others.


The experience was deeply frustrating, but it was also a reminder that doctors are imperfect. They do the best they can, but they aren't mind readers, and they can't feel what you're feeling. Being willing to accept that, and acknowledging just how imperfect I am at my own job, has given me a measure of grace. 041b061a72


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...
bottom of page